The future of archaeology in Africa and the Diaspora

Globinars on decolonisation and methodological innovation to social justice

The Africa Oxford Initiative will host monthly ‘Globinars’ on the future of anthropological research. The impact of the Covid-19 pandemic and increasing global inequalities, suggest that archaeology must reinvent itself to go beyond colonial applications and provide models of alternative knowledge that have the potential to contribute towards sustainable development.

The webinars will feature experts from around the world to explore questions such as:

• Who receives and benefits from funding for research?

• Can we apply Africa’s archaeological and cultural heritage to contribute to sustainable development, trans-cultural education and social justice?

• Will Africa ever get improved infrastructure for research?

• How can we reinvent archaeology with positive knock-on effects to social justice?

The second Globinar of this series will take place on Friday, March 19 at 4pm UK time.

Why is it that multi-national and other companies operating in Africa do not fund archaeological research by Africans in Africa but do so via researchers and centres in places such as London, New York or Paris? How might African and diasporic archaeologists build strong relationships with private funders or African governments to grow an archaeology that is locally responsive but globally oriented?

This globinar will explore the state of African archaeology on the continent and in the diaspora focussing on the pertinent issue of funding and the role of professional associations, higher education institutions, NGOs and museums in growing the discipline.

Click here to register

Globinar schedule

19 February: Africanising archaeology and palaeoanthropology: decolonisation, race and inequality

Speakers at the inugural globinar will reflected on contemporary practice in African and diasporic archaeology. They explored ways of establishing an archaeology that is ‘African’ (inspired by African and diasporic values) and responsive to needs of the continent, and its diaspora.

Listen in to the conversation here

19 March: African archaeology at home and in the diaspora: funding & the role of professional associations

Why is it that multi-national and other companies operating in Africa do not fund archaeological research by Africans in Africa but do so via researchers and centres in places such as London, New York or Paris?

How might African and diasporic archaeologists build strong relationships with private funders or African governments to grow an archaeology that is locally responsive but globally oriented?

This globinar will explore the state of African archaeology on the continent and in the diaspora focussing on the pertinent issue of funding and the role of professional associations, higher education institutions, NGOs and museums in growing the discipline.

Register here

April 23: Archaeological science in Africa and the Diaspora: present situation and future prospects

Archaeology is increasingly relying on techniques from science to extract information from different categories of evidence. Popular techniques of modern archaeology include reverse engineering of pyrotechnological remains, organic chemistry studies of residues attached to the interior of pots and ancient DNA studies of animal and human tissues.

However, these methods demand very expensive infrastructure, most of which is not available in archaeology departments on the continent and in the diaspora. In the absence of resources, knowhow and equipment most archaeology practised by those on the continent remains traditional (culture historical and ethnographic) in orientation.

What might be done for Africa to develop capacity in archaeological science? This panel will offer solutions to this question and map a way forward for the continent to access laboratories and equipment through collaboration and other means.

Register here

Partners

These globinars are hosted in partnership with TORCH Oxford, St Cross College, Oxford’s School of Archaeology, University of Cambridge, University of Cape Town, Great Zimbabwe University, Pan African Congress for Prehistory and Related Studies, Society for Black Archaeologists, Society for Africanist Archaeologists, SAPIENS, and Wenner Gren Foundation.

© 2018
The Africa Oxford Initiative
Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health
The Peter Medawar Building for Pathogen Research
University of Oxford
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Oxford, OX1 3SY
United Kingdom

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